RHY Resources

Personal Navigators Increase Higher Education Access

A recent Seattle Times article describes work being done by Seattle Education Access (SEA), a small nonprofit organization in Washington State, which uses personal navigators to connect young people with higher education and to help them succeed once they enroll. The program targets “opportunity youth,” young people ages 16-24 who are not currently in school or working. A recent evaluation of the program conducted by Urban Institute showed promising results: two-thirds of the young people engaged with SEA enrolled in college, compared to only 23% of disconnected youth trying to make it on their own. Seventy-one percent of participants remained enrolled for four quarters following engagement.

RHY providers can share this resource with local education partners and learn more about SEA’s approach at https://www.seattletimes.com/education-lab/nearly-19000-youth-in-king-county-are-neither-working-or-in-school-how-one-seattle-nonprofit-is-changing-that/

 

 

Changing Juvenile Justice in Pennsylvania

A new report, Transforming Justice: Bringing Pennsylvania’s Young People Safely Home from Juvenile Justice Placements was recently released by the Juvenile Law Center with funding from Annie E. Casey Foundation. The report details the current state of juvenile placements in Pennsylvania, where the number of youth in placement and rates of racial disparity exceed national averages. Authors argue the state needs to change its system for how youth enter the system, and do a better job involving families in order to keep youth in their homes. The report includes recommendations from other states that have successfully reduced the number of incarcerated youth by expanding prevention services. RHY programs serving young people with juvenile justice involvement can use this report to learn about promising practices for reducing unnecessary placements, and recommendations for ensuring necessary placements are safe and supportive.

Read the report at https://www.aecf.org/resources/transforming-justice/

 

Arizona YES Survey Examines Trafficking

The Arizona State University Office of Sex Trafficking Intervention Research recently published results from the 2019 Youth Experiences Survey (YES), which has been used to collect data since 2014 on the life experiences, substance use, mental health issues, risk and protective factors, and sex and labor trafficking experiences of RHY in the state. Over half (53%) of the 167 young people ages 18-25 who participated had experienced some form of trafficking; over one-quarter (28%) experienced both sex and labor trafficking. RHY providers can use this resource to learn more about precursors to being trafficked among runaway and homeless youth, ages at which RHY first experience trafficking, and the circumstances young people say pushed them into trafficking.

Download the survey and analysis at https://socialwork.asu.edu/sites/default/files/stir/yes_2019_report_asu_stir.pdf

 

Responding to Rising Suicide Rates among Youth

In October 2019, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) released data indicating a significant rise in suicide attempts and deaths by suicide among young people. According to the CDC, as reported in a recent New York Times article “The Crisis in Youth Suicide,” the rate of suicide among youth ages 10-24 increased by 56% between 2007 and 2017, and represents the second leading cause of death for youth ages 15-19. The article describes what research psychologists and suicide prevention experts believe is driving the increased rate, and what adults can do to intervene, such as helping young people ‘unplug’ from social media and get enough sleep, and asking them directly and without judgement about their mental health and suicidal feelings. RHY providers should be aware of the heightened need for suicide screening, and can use this resource to educate volunteers and families about the issue.

Access the article at https://www.nytimes.com/2019/12/02/well/mind/the-crisis-in-youth-suicide.html

 

Improving RHY Chances to Secure Future “Good Jobs”

This article from Brookings provides an overview of key takeaways from a study on employment at age 29 conducted in 2018 with Child Trends. By comparing employment quality for 29-year-olds from disadvantaged and non-disadvantaged backgrounds, researchers identified factors that make the most difference in the work lives of disadvantaged young people. These include receiving higher wages in early jobs, participating in career and technical programs that are relationship-based, and earning education credentials. RHY providers can use this resource to design effective employment programming for youth, and to help young people understand the long-term impact of early work-related decisions.

Read the article at https://www.brookings.edu/blog/the-avenue/2018/11/14/six-takeaways-on-how-young-adults-find-good-jobs/

 
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