RHY News

FYSB Webinar Series on the Affordable Care Act

Recordings Now Available for Part I & II of the FYSB Affordable Care Act Webinar Series

Part I: Getting Youth the Health Care They Need: Available Options under the Affordable Care Act

This webinar provides an overview of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) and direction for navigating and enrolling in the health insurance market place. The webinar is presented by Kim Gillan, Regional Director, Region VIII for the Office of Inter-governmental and External Affairs at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Participants will receive information about the health coverage options available to unaccompanied youth under the ACA, strategies for effective outreach and enrollment for this population, and methods to engage stakeholders and develop formal and informal relationships that facilitates access to care and services. This is the first in a three part series.

To access this webinar, please visit:  https://nationalsafeplace.ilinc.com/join/vsxptmp

Additional ACA resources are included below. These and other ACA resources are available on the RHYTTAC website: http://www.rhyttac.net/resources

Apply for Medicaid & CHIP through the Health Insurance Marketplace: https://nspn.memberclicks.net/assets/docs/RHYTTAC/apply-for-medicaid-chip-through-marketplace%201.pdf

Get Covered: A One-Page Guide to the Health Insurance Marketplace: https://nspn.memberclicks.net/assets/docs/RHYTTAC/get-covered-a-one-page-guide-to-the-marketplace.pdf


Part II: Enrolling Vulnerable Youth in Medicaid

This webinar provides an overview of Medicaid enrollment of vulnerable youth, including those having aged out of foster care and unaccompanied homeless youth.  Focus will be on new Medicaid opportunities with the Affordable Care Act, outreach to youth, the National campaign, and highlighted differences in states that have expanded Medicaid and those that have not.  Challenges for enrollment and strategies to address these will be identified.  The webinar is presented by Annie Hollis, Division of Eligibility and Enrollment, Children and Health Programs Group, Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services.

To access this webinar, please visit: https://nationalsafeplace.ilinc.com/join/xmxkwsv

 

RHY Data Sharing and Data Transfer for Local HMIS

TO: All Runaway and Homeless Youth Grantees
FROM: Resa Matthew, Director, Division of Adolescent Development and Support

This memo is a follow-up to the Family and Youth Services Bureau (FYSB) memo dated May 26, 2015, on the topic of Runaway and Homeless Youth (RHY) Data Collection and Data Entry into the Runaway and Homeless Youth – Homeless Management Information System (RHY-HMIS). The May 26, 2015 memo clarified requirements for data collection from youth clients and for entry of client level data into RHY-HMIS at the local level. This memo addresses data sharing at the local level and the bi-annual transfer of client-level RHY data to the national RHY-HMIS system.

Data Sharing
Data collection is separate from data sharing. Data sharing in this memo refers to the electronic sharing of client information via an HMIS.

The RHY regulation states:

Confidential information. All information including lists of names, addresses, photographs, and records of evaluation of individuals served by a runaway and homeless youth project shall be confidential and shall not be disclosed or transferred to any individual or to any public or private agency without written consent of the youth and family. Youth served by a runaway and homeless youth project shall have the right to review their records; to correct a record or file a statement of disagreement; and to be apprised of the individuals who have reviewed their records. Procedures shall be established for the training of project staff in the protection of these rights and for the secure storage of records.” [45 CFR §1351.19(b)(1)] and “State law protection. HHS policies regarding confidential information and experimentation and treatment shall not apply if HHS finds that State law is more protective of the rights of runaway or otherwise homeless youth.” [45 CFR §1351.19(b)(4)].

Therefore, by regulation no data may be shared about any youth served in a RHY funded program unless the youth has consented.i This includes sharing via HMIS. FYSB requires that for youth under age 18 the RHY program receives the required parental consent prior to information sharing. Youth age 18 or over may consent for themselves. Information may, however, be disclosed without consent to “a government agency involved in the disposition of criminal charges against an individual runaway and homeless youth.” Sec. 312(b)(7), 42 U.S.C. § 5712(b)(7).

HMIS System Administration Application
HMIS systems are required to work collaboratively with their Continuum of Care (CoC) to establish data sharing protocols as part of their HMIS policies and procedures. Established protocols must address requirements of all programs using the HMIS. These protocols must conform to the data sharing requirement of the RHY regulations as follows:

  • The RHY Act requires that applicants for grants agree not to disclose records on individual youth (with a limited exception for purposes of compiling statistics). See Sec 312(b)(7) and 322(a)(13). Thus, absent consent, multiple agencies sharing a single HMIS implementation could not share identifying information between them.
  • In CoCs where data are shared (i.e., an open system), RHY client records can NOT be shared unless written consent is obtained.

Relationship to National Data Transfer of RHY information
FYSB will continue to require a bi-annual transfer of client level RHY data to the national RHY-HMIS system. All data transferred will be de-identified prior to transfer.

It is critical for national reporting that RHY is able to determine the actual numbers of youth served without duplication of the youth as they move between programs. In order to create a unique RHY client ID for each youth served, a record including all basic demographic data (name, social security number, date of birth, race, and gender) must be completed for each youth and must be correct. It is from these data that the unique RHY client ID will be generated. Duplicate records are created when the basic demographic information is not complete or correct. Again to emphasize, RHY individual client data are confidential and must not be shared except in the instances referenced in this communication.

As a reminder, RHY grantees were expected to begin entering client-level data into RHY-HMIS by April 15, 2015. By now, grantees should have been engaging with their local Continuum of Care (CoC) to ensure they have access to and training for the HMIS designated by their CoC. All RHYMIS records that were open as of October 1, 2014 or later were to be entered into RHY-HMIS by July 31, 2015.

If you have questions regarding RHY data collection or data entry requirements, or the regulations regarding data sharing or transfer, please contact [email protected].

i The statute was amended after the regulation was written to provide that information can also be disclosed to “a government agency involved in the disposition of criminal charges against an individual runaway and homeless youth.” Sec. 312(b)(7), 42 U.S.C. § 5712(b)(7).

RHY Data Sharing and Data Transfer Memo

 

Community Notice: Appropriation Act for FY 2016

Dear FYSB Grantee:

As you are aware, the Government Fiscal Year (FY) 2015 ends on September 30, 2015 and an Appropriation Act for FY 2016 has not yet been passed. The Administration strongly believes that a lapse in appropriations should not occur, and that there is enough time for Congress to act to prevent a lapse. However, prudent management requires that we prepare for an orderly execution of contingency plans in the unfortunate event of a lapse. In the event a continuing resolution or a FY2016 budget is not passed and a lapse of funding occurs, I wanted to provide you with information related to our grant administration processes.

Should a lapse in funding occur, HHS and Administration for Children and Families staff will not be available to provide routine administrative support services. HHS will, however, maintain the Payment Management System in an operational status to continue processing grant drawdown requests, so that payments can be made for excepted programs. The robust internal controls that currently exist would continue to ensure the integrity of grant drawdown requests and payments. For awards received prior to the gap in funding, you may also be able to continue drawing funds from prior awards during an appropriations lapse. If you received your notice of grant award with restrictive terms and conditions, or if your drawdown request triggers one of the Payment Management System edit checks and or the drawdown limit controls, you may not be able to drawdown funds.

If you are considering submitting an application for additional HHS federal assistance funding, please be advised, that the Grants.gov system will be operational and will be accepting applications from prospective grantees. HHS will take action on those applications for fully funded and excepted programs. For those programs which are non-excepted, the Grants.gov system will to accept and store applications until such time as the responsible Department has the authority and funding to return to normal business operations.

Please check our website at www.acf.hhs.gov and www.hhs.gov for updates. Thank you for your assistance with this period of a potential government shut-down and your ongoing support of the Administration for Children and Families.

Communication Notice to RHY Grantees

 

US Dept. of Education Releases New Guidance on Homeless Youth Determinations

Yesterday, the U.S. Department of Education issued a Dear Colleague letter clarifying determinations for unaccompanied homeless youth for financial aid. It revises USED policy so that all applicants under age 24, including those who are 22 or 23 years old, and who are unaccompanied and homeless, or self-supporting and at risk of being homeless, qualify for a homeless youth determination and will be considered independent students.

Importantly, the clarifies that youth who are between the ages of 21 and 24 and who are unaccompanied and homeless, or self-supporting and at risk of being homeless, qualify for a homeless youth determination, and will be considered independent students. This is a change from previous guidance that defined “youth” as 21 and under.

The July 29 ED Dear Colleague letter may be downloaded here: http://naehcy.org/educational-resources/higher-ed

NAEHCY’s higher education page contains many additional resources for youth, school district homeless liaisons, homeles service providers, financial aid administrators, and other higher education professionals, including:

  • A Higher Education Hotline, (855) 446-2673 (toll-free) or [email protected]
  • Podcasts
  • FAFSA Tip Sheets
  • Determination Templates
  • Toolkits on financial aid, college access, and college success

For more information, and for assistance related to higher education, please contact NAEHCY’s Director of Higher Education Initiatives, Cyekeia Lee, at:
Toll-free helpline: (855)-446-2673
Phone: (313)-436-5949
Email: [email protected]

 

RHY-OHS Partnership Dissemination Plan

The attached RHY-OHS Partnership Dissemination Plan is a resource document developed in coordination with the Office of Head Start to provide to RHY grantees (primary focus on Maternity Group Home grantees).  The information will assist grantees in identifying important factors that influence a child’s behavior and effective response strategies.

RHY-OHS Partnership Dissemination Plan 2015

 

Annual RHY Grantee Survey Now Available

It is time for the annual RHY Grantee Survey. The information gathered from this survey will help the Family and Youth Services Bureau understand more about the work you do at the local level and will help RHYTTAC in planning the training and technical assistance that would be most helpful. The survey should take approximately 10 – 20 minutes to complete. Although only one answer per grantee agency is required, the instrument does allow for staff operating from different role perspectives to include their points of view as well. Please forward to other staff within your organization. The deadline for the completion of the surveys is Friday, July 17. Thank you in advance for the information.

https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/2015GranteeAssessment

 

RHY Data Collection Memo

DATE: May 26, 2015
TO: All Runaway and Homeless Youth Grantees
FROM: Resa Matthew, Director; Division of Adolescent Development and Support
SUBJECT: RHY Data Collection and Data Entry into RHY-HMIS 

Data Collection
The Family and Youth Services Bureau (FYSB) is providing this memo as a reminder to all Runaway and Homeless Youth (RHY) grantees that collecting data from a youth client who is served by a FYSB funded project is not optional – it is a requirement of receiving FYSB funding. Specifically, all FYSB-funded projects must attempt to collect RHY data from clients benefitting from those funds. The transition from data entry in RHYMIS to data entry in RHY-HMIS does not signal any change in this requirement. RHY grantees must continue to collect data from youth clients and enter it into the RHY-HMIS system.

FYSB is still required to collect RHY data which must be reported to Congress and must remain in compliance with the statute. RHY legislation states: “Grantees will also be required to submit statistical reports profiling the clients served. The statistical reporting requirements are mandated by the Act which states that ‘runaway and homeless youth projects shall keep adequate statistical records profiling the children and families which it serves. . .’ ” [45CFR §1351.20].

Data Entry
RHY data collection and entry are requirements for recipients of FYSB funding. Data are expected to be collected on each youth served in each RHY program and each time a youth is served by the program (i.e., for every intake/exit).

FYSB, as a partner with the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) and other federal agencies serving homeless populations, has made the determination that RHY grant recipients are now (as of April 2015) required to report via the local community’s Homeless Management Information System (HMIS). This means the following:

RHY grantees were expected to begin entering client-level data into RHY-HMIS by April 15, 2015. By now, grantees should have been engaging with their local Continuum of Care (CoC) to ensure they have access to and training for the HMIS designated by their CoC. All RHYMIS records that were open as of October 1, 2014 or later need to be entered into RHY-HMIS by July 31, 2015.

If you have questions regarding RHY data collection or data entry requirements, please contact [email protected].

  • All clients served by RHY programs are expected to be entered into the HMIS.
  • All information required by RHY as outlined in the HMIS Data Standards is entered for each youth. This includes the youth’s name, social security number, date of birth, etc.
  • When youth do not know all or some of the information asked, RHY grantee staff will follow the HMIS Data Standards Manual and guidance of the local HMIS. For example, for youth who do not know their social security number or know part of their social security number, grantee staff should enter the partial social security number if the youth provides it or leave the entry blank, and in the data quality field identify the “client does not know.”
  • Including the client’s basic demographic information in the HMIS is critical to improving the accuracy of client counts. It enables the system to recognize an existing client record and prevent duplication.

RHY grantees were expected to begin entering client-level data into RHY-HMIS by April 15, 2015. By now, grantees should have been engaging with their local Continuum of Care (CoC) to ensure they have access to and training for the HMIS designated by their CoC. All RHYMIS records that were open as of October 1, 2014 or later need to be entered into RHY-HMIS by July 31, 2015. If you have questions regarding RHY data collection or data entry requirements, please contact [email protected].

 

National Prevention Week 2015 is May 17-23. Get involved!

A note from Mr. William H. Bentley, Associate Commissioner, Family and Youth Services Bureau and Frances M. Harding, Director at Center for Substance Abuse Prevention:

Dear Colleagues,

This week is National Prevention Week, a time for all of us to focus on behavioral health, the essential role it plays in the overall health of young people and their families, and its importance to our productivity and prosperity as a nation. The Administration for Children and Families’ Family and Youth Services Bureau is a partner with the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration in supporting National Prevention Week.  During this week, and throughout the year, we encourage you to bring awareness of the behavioral health issues that may be experienced by the children, youth, and families you work with every day. 

The daily health themes of National Prevention Week cover many behavioral health issues, including: tobacco use, underage drinking, excessive alcohol use, opioid and prescription drug misuse, illicit drug use and youth marijuana use, and suicide.  By increasing awareness and educating others about these issues, we will make great strides in overcoming the challenges of youth homelessness, adolescent pregnancy, and domestic violence, and help our nation’s young people and their families lead healthy, productive, and violence-free lives.

In honor of National Prevention Week, community organizations in every U.S. state and many U.S. territories are hosting events (http://www.samhsa.gov/prevention-week/community-events) to inform the public about the risks associated with substance use and misuse and ways to promote personal health. State and federal agencies and national organizations are sharing information about actions communities can take to prevent mental or substance use disorders.

I invite you to join us in recognizing National Prevention Week by taking the Prevention Pledge (https://www.facebook.com/samhsa/app_227679917356169) and encouraging the youth and families you work with to do the same. In taking the Pledge, we demonstrate to others that we care and are actively working to advance behavioral health.  I also invite you to take a photo of how you maintain a healthy lifestyle and what inspires you to choose prevention.  Share your photos via Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram using the hashtag #ChoosePrevention (https://twitter.com/search?q=%23ChoosePrevention) to inspire others. Thank you for your commitment to National Prevention Week and the health and well-being of our young people and their families.

Sincerely,

William H. Bentley
Associate Commissioner
Family and Youth Services Bureau

Frances M. Harding
Director
Center for Substance Abuse Prevention

 

FYSB is now accepting applications for the Competitive Abstinence Education Grant Program

The Family & Youth Services Bureau is now accepting applications for the Competitive Abstinence Education Grant Program: http://www.acf.hhs.gov/programs/fysb/programs/adolescent-pregnancy-prevention/programs/aegp-competitive.

The purpose of the Competitive Abstinence Education Grant Program is to provide funding for additional tools to address the rates of teen pregnancy among adolescent youth who are at greatest risk of sexually transmitted infections and most likely to bear children out of wedlock. Program plans will focus on the social, psychological, and health gains to be realized by delaying initiation of sexual activity and engaging in healthy relationships. Grantees under this program will be expected to develop a targeted and medically accurate approach to reducing teen pregnancies through abstinence education.

Application Due Date: June 24, 2015

Read the Funding Opportunity Announcement here: http://www.acf.hhs.gov/grants/open/foa/view/HHS-2015-ACF-ACYF-AR-0978.

 

Workforce Innovation Opportunity Act (WIOA) Youth Training and Employment Guidance Letter Now Available

The WIOA was signed into law by President Obama on July 22, 2014. WIOA is designed to help job seekers access employment, education, training, and support services to succeed in the labor market and to match employers with the skilled workers they need to compete in the global economy.

The majority of WIOA provisions will become effective on July 1, 2015. In preparation for this date, the Department of Labor (DOL) Employment and Training Administration (ETA) released a very important WIOA Youth Program Training and Employment Guidance Letter (TEGL), which conveys the vision for a transformed workforce system under WIOA. The guidance letter encourages workforce system leaders and partners, such as those within the FYSB grantee community, to take necessary steps to actively support the full implementation of WIOA. It also offers several action steps which can be acted upon by youth serving program. Further, the guidance letter provides an overview of several upcoming guidance documents and technical assistance opportunities which can help FYSB programs build effective relationships. 

It is FYSB's goal to share as much relevant information about other federal resources impacting our programs as possible. This guidance letter is being sent to states, local workforce areas, and other recipients of Workforce Investment Act (WIA) Title I youth formula funds, who are working to achieve a shared understanding and successful implementation of WIOA youth programs in order to improve the lives of youth.

Please visit the new guidance letter, TEGL 21-14 -- Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) Youth Program Transition, site here: http://wdr.doleta.gov/directives/corr_doc.cfm?DOCN=4244

 
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